Jameh Mosque of Yazd - A blend of art and religion at the heart of the desert

Jameh Mosque of Yazd - A blend of art and religion at the heart of the desert

(Persia Digest) - Jameh Mosque of Yazd is one of the most beautiful, unique and important tourist attractions of Yazd Province, central Iran, in the form of an iwan at the heart of desert. This is one of the most beautiful mosques of the Timurid period, considered to be the most beautiful architectural masterpiece of the 9th century AH in terms of tile works, the tall portal, minarets, and inscriptions.

Yazd Province is the second adobe city in the world, attracting many foreign and domestic tourists every year with its noteworthy and unique historic and religious sites.

The Jameh Mosque of Yazd is one of the unique attractions of Yazd Province and a most noteworthy, historical artistic heritage and masterpiece of Islamic architecture.  The original mosque building was constructed under Ala'oddoleh Garshasb of the Al-e Bouyeh Dynasty (6th century AH), but the current mosque is attributed to the Muzaffarids and Timurids in the 8th and 9th centuries AH.

The artistic and architectural merits of this mosque include the steadiness of the exquisite and beautiful tile works, the tall portal, two exquisite inscriptions - one in kufic and the other one in thuluth script - on the cobalt blue mosaic tiles beside the magnificent portal, two beautiful minarets and the tile decorations of the inner walls of the shabestan [sanctuary chamber] and the inner and outer surfaces of the dome.

The most attractive part of this building can be named as the complex of iwan, arcaded courtyard and the surrounding area. The tall iwan is covered with a collection of the most beautiful decorations of mosaic tiles, as well as arabesque and plant patterns and girih tiles. The main mihrab is decorated with mosaic tiles, inscriptions and brickworks. The master's name and construction date of the mihrab have been inscribed on the two star-shaped tiles set in it. The mosque dome is double-shelled with subtle flower patterns on the outside, where the word “al-Mulkullah” has been repeated on the stem of the flower in Kufic.

The two minarets of the mosque, measuring approximately 52 meters in height, are among the tallest minarets in the world. The have a diameter of about 8 meters, built in the Safavid period. They collapsed in 1934 and were reconstructed.

 

Photos: Milad Raf’at / Mehr

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