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Nowruz in Kermanshah – The 5-day ruler

Nowruz in Kermanshah – The 5-day ruler
ID : N-1513 Date : 2018/03/29 - 10:00

(Persia Digest) – Nowruz ceremonies in Kermanshah and surrounding areas, in western Iran, begin with spring cleaning and carpet cleaning. An old custom in Kermanshah is “shaking carpets”, when carpets are hung on bars on rooftops and the sound of brooms hit against the carpets is heard in all the back alleys of the city. Cleaning or “shaking carpets” is a big part of the spring cleaning which has been observed in Kermanshah from old times.

Chaharshanbeh Suri is also a loved celebration in Kermanshah, where it is an ancient Persian custom to light fires on hilltops to gather around, especially in Kurdistan.

Mir Nowruzi is another custom still observed in this region to some extent. During the first days of Nowruz, men in red clothes and faces painted black play the tambourine and sing and dance for entertainment. The last of this custom still observed is the selection of “Mir Nowruzi” and “Hakem panj ruzeh” [5-day ruler]. This is only seen in Nowruz, when they chant their Nowruz songs.

“Shāl Dareki” or “Throwing the shawl”

A very interesting custom in Kermanshah is “Shāl Dareki” or “Throwing the shawl”. Young people hang their shawls down from the rooftops into the rooms and ask people for gifts by singing songs. One such Kurdish song is: “I hang my shawl down, it comes, it comes; don’t burn my shawl, don’t leave it empty.” The people living in the house place walnuts, sweets, chick peas, raisins, and boiled eggs in the shawls, tie a knot around them, and say: “Pull it up.” In some cases, as a joke, they place a lit piece of charcoal in the shawl and send it up.

Any untoward incidents are taken as a bad omen by people who believe that by being happy on this day, you will be happy throughout the entire year.

There is also a ceremony called “Now Eid” [First Eid] on Nowruz day in Kermanshah when friends and family visit those who have lost a loved one in the year leading up to Nowruz and pray for the dearly departed.

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