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Sholezard – The traditional Iranian dessert

Sholezard – The traditional Iranian dessert

Sholezard is one of the most famous and popular traditional desserts in Iran which is mainly prepared as nazri (offering of free food for a vow) for Iranian religious ceremonies. In Ramadan, this dessert is also made for iftar.

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Chekdermeh - A traditional Torkaman food in NE Iran

Chekdermeh - A traditional Torkaman food in NE Iran

Chekdermeh is a traditional food cooked in Golestan Province, Bandar Torkaman and Aq Qala. It is very much like the estanboli-polo of Tehran and is cooked in a traditional pot called ghazan. This Torkamani food is prepared easily and quickly.

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Sheshandaz stew of Guilan

Sheshandaz stew of Guilan

Sheshandaz stew is a local dish of Guilan Province in northern Iran which can be cooked in a number of ways with apples, eggs, carrots, and so on.

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Yakhni - the traditional northeastern Iranian dish

Yakhni - the traditional northeastern Iranian dish

In Khorasan Province, all kinds of dishes are made from meat; chelo gousht from Mashhad and yakhni from Dargaz are among the most famous. Yakhni is a very delicious dish and is quite easy to make, but there are tips on how to cook it and failure to adhere to them will spoil your yakhni.

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Vegetarian ‘Yatimcheh’ from the Persian kitchen

Vegetarian ‘Yatimcheh’ from the Persian kitchen

Yatimcheh is a popular dish which is originally vegetarian. It is, however, prepared with different recipes across Iran. The aubergine yatimcheh is suitable for both vegetarians and dieters for its low calorie count. The following is the original recipe for this dish.

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Omaj potage – A cure for colds

Omaj potage – A cure for colds

Omaj is a popular potage in Tabriz, northwestern Iran, which is traditionally made in the cold season. It is very good for preventing or curing colds.

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Health benefits of Mazandaran sour āsh

Health benefits of Mazandaran sour āsh

Ash-e torsh, or sour potage, is a traditional dish of Mazandaran, northern Iran, which was traditionally cooked on Chaharshanbeh-Souri – a bonfire night celebrated on the last Tuesday of the Iranian year just before Nowruz. This āsh, or a thick potage of legumes and herbs, has a sour-sweet taste and has come to be known as Ash-e torsh [torsh=sour in Persian]. In the older recipes, forty different herbs and vegetables were used and it was cooked as a healing recipe.

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