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Morris Hall, who was in George Floyd’s car at the time of the tragedy, is claiming his right not to testify against anyone to whom he has sold drugs in the past. On Tuesday, Derek Chou’s case continued the investigation of several police officers in charge of training officers in Minneapolis.

At the trial of the murder of 40-year-old black American George Floyd, jurors will ask very little or nothing from a key witness for the drama in prison, he is in prison, demanding his right not to testify against himself.

Morris Hall, who is being held on separate charges, appeared before Judge Peter Cahill, who is presiding over the trial of white police officer Derek Suev, via video link on Tuesday, April 6th. The magistrate agreed that “there is only the smallest thing that can be addressed” without violating his rights, and he will then give a final decision.

Derek Chowdhury, 45, was charged with murdering George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25, and for more than nine minutes he was placed on his knees around his neck, sparking historical drama in the United States. He pleads not guilty and confirms that Black Forty died of something more than that.

5th Amendment

At the beginning of the trial, his lawyer argued that George Floyd had swallowed two pills in a car with Morris Hall and another friend shortly before police arrived. However, George Floyd’s girlfriend, Morris Hall, testified last week that the couple had sold drugs. Mr Eric Nelson, who is defending the police officer, confirmed Tuesday that Morris Hall would like to ask George Floyd if he “supplied or sold prohibited items” shortly before his death.

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However, Morris Hall’s lawyer realized that this would sue his client if the over-examination was eventually confirmed, and proposed the 5th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which would not allow him to testify against you.

The judge ruled in his favor, and if Morris Hall was summoned to jury duty he could only inquire into George Floyd’s attitude before he died, and ruled that there was nothing else. Before giving the green light on the matter, Eric asked Nelson to clarify his questions in writing.

“Far from the neck”

After this practical discussion, the investigation resumed with the interrogation of several police officers in charge of training officers in Minneapolis. “They are taught to stay away from the neck as much as possible,” says Johnny Mersil, who coordinates training in the use of force.

The Los Angeles police officer, Jodi Sticker, who conducted more than 2,500 assessments of coercion by co-workers, was also prosecuted. In the case of Floyd, he insisted, “in my opinion, the power used was too much.”

The government plans to summon another expert on police procedures on Wednesday, before starting a medical debate on the cause of George Floyd’s death. Discussions are expected to continue for about two weeks. Judges’ verdict in this extraordinary trial is not expected until the end of April.

With AFP

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