Fans will be able to watch the beginning of the phenomenon but the sunrise should somewhat spoil the note of the most interesting part.

At the beginning of the phenomenon, the moon will simply be in the semi-shadow of the Earth which will cause a gradual dimming on one side or the other of the satellite.

At the beginning of the phenomenon, the moon will simply be in the semi-shadow of the Earth which will cause a gradual dimming on one side or the other of the satellite.

France Press agency

Astronomy enthusiasts and early risers will be treated to a beautiful celestial spectacle on the night of May 15-16. In fact, the alignment of the Sun, Earth, and Moon would be nearly perfect and the Moon would pass entirely in Earth’s shadow. So there will be a total lunar eclipse.

The beginning of the phenomenon will be visible throughout Switzerland, especially since the weather forecast looks favorable. In fact, the moon will enter Earth’s shadow at 4:27 am, while the total phase of the eclipse begins at 5:29 am. The problem is that the sun will rise at 6 am while the moon should set at 6:03 am, before the total eclipse will be at 6:11 am, according to signals from the Astronomical Society in Geneva.

There is no orange in sight

However, during this total phase, the spectacle is the most interesting because the moon is decorated in a beautiful coppery orange. Before and after passing through the shadow, the satellite is simply in the semi-shadow of the Earth. Which does not produce any particular color, only a gradual darkening on one side or the other of the moon.

If you want to see this eclipse in better conditions, you will have to be in South America, Central America, the eastern half of North America, or the West Indies. However, Western Europe and much of West Africa will also benefit from a large part of this phenomenon.

In South America and the eastern half of the USA, the total eclipse will be fully visible.

In South America and the eastern half of the USA, the total eclipse will be fully visible.

NASA

Fans still remember her: The Swiss were already able to enjoy a total lunar eclipse on July 26, 2018. For more than an hour after dark (and nearly a full two hours), the moon was full in Earth’s shadow. The total eclipse at that time was the longest in the century.

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