What really happened in Liaoning

Imagine that you leave the house and find yourself in a rain of “worms”.. In these hours, a viral video on TikTok from China is doing the rounds on the web, as we see cars covered in creatures that look like worms, while pedestrians walk on the sidewalk with umbrellas to shelter from the alleged rain of invertebrates. But what is correct?


Viral video

The photos are from Liaoning Province, China It immortalized the phenomenon that aroused astonishment and disgust for many, and unleashed the imagination of users on social networks. According to one of the hypotheses that is being circulated more insistently on the web, the “worms” will end up in a tornado and thus will rise from the ground and then fall again on the city.




animal rain

On rare occasions, individual weather events of animals raining from the sky, such as fish and frogs, have been recorded all over the world. These events are often associated with hurricanes or severe stormswhich can suck in objects from the sea or land and carry them up into the atmosphere before dropping them back to the ground.

Among the most famous similar cases are the shrimp rains in Sri Lanka in 2012 and fish in 2014, or the rains of tadpoles in Japan in 2009.

In the small town of Yoro, Honduras, the phenomenon of hundreds of small fish dropping is known as “Lluvia de Peces,” similar to what was reported in Texas in late 2021.

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Poplar flowers

However, these are abnormal seizures and, most likely, If it rains in Liaoning Province, it will be poplarsvery common in this part of China, which have a shape similar to worms.

It is very normal for these flowers to fall at certain periods on the street and on cars, and those who are not familiar with this phenomenon can mistake them for small invertebrates at first sight.

Currently, the Chinese authorities have not provided official details or explanations regarding the video bouncing from one part of the web to another.


Photo credit: Twitter Insider Paper/123RF

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