Well, I'm addicted to Cookie Clicker again

For several years now, I’ve been a fan of progressive and idle games. My passion for this genre has a very clear starting point, which I’m sure I share with many people: Candy pressing game. I played Candy pressing game Shortly after it was first released as a browser game in 2013, and although I played it for a while, I finally got it out. earlier this week, Candy pressing game It launched on Steam, and like a moth to flame, I’m back for this remake.

Everyone who played Candy pressing game Before you probably wouldn’t be surprised by the fact that I’m addicted to it again. It’s hard to avoid the trap Candy pressing game, where the game takes you from the first seconds and does not let you go. The only difference between now and when I play it the first time is that, the second time around, at least I know what I’m getting myself into.

for beginners, Candy pressing game It is an idle game where the goal is to create cookies – initially by clicking on the giant cookie on the left side of the screen – and then spend it on ways to make more cookies. At its core, it’s a game about seeing how big you can get from certain numbers, and as it turns out, that’s a lot of fun. I think we have the brains of monkeys to thank for the fact that we are so easily amused.

Still, the allure is hard to deny Candy pressing game. What starts with you just wanting to see the number of cookies you produce every second grows larger and eventually becomes a strange and surreal journey of cookie making. I won’t spoil the twists and turns Candy pressing game For those who haven’t played it before, but let’s just say it’s not as simple as it might seem on the surface. There is more than just making new buildings and knowing how high your cookies rise in a second.

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Between recruiting grandmothers for an army of baking cookies, working in cookie mines, or building witch towers where cookies are summoned using magic, Candy pressing game It certainly has its charm. However, as a name Candy pressing gameSuggested game type, this is supposed to be a slow-burning game in which you gradually progress. This means that you won’t unlock everything the game has to offer in a matter of hours, days, or even weeks – Candy pressing game It was up and running for long periods of time.

I don’t remember the last time I played the browser version of the game, but I know it was over five years ago. at that time since, Candy pressing game It has received a large number of updates that seem to have greatly expanded the amount of content offered. While I don’t really know what to do with this new content since I’ve made an effort to avoid reading patch notes from the past several years, I know enough about Candy pressing game To know it’s worth watching. This fact alone has me excited to research the game again now that it’s on Steam.

The Steam version also comes with a great soundtrack composed by C418, probably best known for his work on it Maine Craftthe sound. C418 music was created for Candy pressing game Gorgeous, and at least at first, he’s cold and very optimistic. I look forward to seeing how the soundtrack changes as I delve deeper into the game and Candy pressing game It gets weirder than ever.

Beyond the new soundtrack, this is more or less Candy pressing game This is available for free online. For some, it might be a little odd for a cookie to run $5 on Steam, but given the amount of content that’s been in the game for years and extrapolating to this day, that’s definitely worth spending $5 for me. Of course, there’s a more masochistic part of me that wants to record my total playtime in Steam just so I can see how long I’ve been building my cookie empire, although I can see why someone wouldn’t like that either.

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The Steam version has its benefits, too. for example, Candy pressing game It takes advantage of Steam’s cloud saving, so you no longer have to worry about nukes being saved because you’ve cleared your browser’s cache or (somewhat ironically). Eventually, the Steam version will get Steam Workshop support as well, which means players will be able to install mods with a certain degree of ease. I can remember installing mods for the browser version, so getting workshop support will likely be useful at some point down the road.

But even without a lot of new features to launch Steam, this is it Candy pressing game. It’s a known quantity at this point, and it’s either a nostalgic trip down memory lane for those who’ve played Cookie Clicker before, or it’s a prime example of the progressive genre for those who haven’t. I’m looking forward to exploring new content I haven’t tested yet over the coming weeks, but most importantly, my primal brain is excited to see some really, really large numbers.

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